DEATH PENALTY,: Senate’s Capital Punishment For Drug Dealers, Endorsed By House Of Reps.

DEATH PENALTY, Senate’s Capital Punishment For Drug Dealers, Endorsed By House Of Reps.
DEATH PENALTY, Senate’s Capital Punishment For Drug Dealers, Endorsed By House Of Reps.

The House of Representatives in Nigeria is poised to back the Senate’s recent approval of capital punishment for those convicted of drug trafficking and dealing, awaiting the bill’s arrival in the lower chamber.

The Nigerian Senate has already taken a firm stance by advocating for the death penalty against those who deal in, import, manufacture or distribute hard drugs and narcotics via any channels.

The resolve came during a review of the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency Act (Amendment) Bill, 2024, with Senate Majority Whip Ali Ndume suggesting an upgrade from life imprisonment to the ultimate penalty during the bill’s discussion.

House Deputy Spokesperson Philip Agbese remarked it is the House’s protocol to align with the Senate on passed bills, particularly those that he believes resonate with the moral weave of the nation and mirror the objectives of the 10th House of Representatives Legislative Agenda.

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The entire House, as per Agbese, is eager to deliberate and expedite the approval of this amendment to reinforce to the Nigerian public their commitment to being a body representative of the populace’s interest and welfare.

Additionally, Lagos State has signaled its readiness to implement the amendment, pending the President’s ratification. State Commissioner for Information and Strategy Gbenga Omotoso indicated that as part of a federal system, the state falls under the overarching jurisdiction of the Senate’s federal legislative purview.

Therefore, upon enactment, Lagos State will adhere to the new law without discretion, aligning with the national legal framework.

“If the Senate has made the law, then it applies across Nigeria,” Omotoso emphasized, affirming that state-level discretion isn’t an option given the federal nature of the legislation.

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